Review: The Girl on the Train

The Girl on the Train
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A brilliant idea for a book let down slightly in execution. Slow in parts and full of characters that have problems or personality disorders. I think Rachel’s landlady is the only “normal” person in the book. The plot twists and narration were enough to keep me listening to the end (I got my copy from Audible) but unfortunately I predicted the ending about three quarters of the way through the book (pretty obvious as you know the author is constructing a plot twist with a limited number of options or characters). I still enjoyed the book – and I’m glad I don’t have nearly as many problems as the characters in the book!

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Review: The Chimp Paradox: The Acclaimed Mind Management Programme to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence and Happiness

The Chimp Paradox: The Acclaimed Mind Management Programme to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence and Happiness
The Chimp Paradox: The Acclaimed Mind Management Programme to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence and Happiness by Steve Peters
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I heard Professor Steve Peters speak at the ASCL conference about his work and his book. As well as being a very entertaining speaker his ideas seemed to make sense, essentially a model for how your brain works and how to learn to work with the primitive aspects to the brain.

I’ll confess I didn’t read the book in the traditional sense but I listened to the book, read by Prof Peters himself (courtesy of my Audible subscription). I find non-fiction books hard to read and thought an audio book would be easier than reading. With a hundred minutes in the car each day the audiobook was indeed better than a paper copy although I did have a tendency to let my mind wander (probably because you don’t get the same kind of imagery in your brain as you do reading a fiction book).

The first few chapters of the book covered the material Steve used in his talk about the chimp, the computer and the human in your brain (SEN teachers will be able to relate to the concept of the chimp being in control!). As well as giving a model to explain how your brain works, the purpose of the book is to train you how to program the brain, replacing the things that happen instinctively with things that you would prefer happen. This is then extended into target/goal setting for yourself and for working with others.

The book avoids using terminology that would bamboozle readers and keeps things simple, explaining why you have to set and follow the strategies set if you want to succeed (and some excellent advice about finding a partner). I would recommend this book to people from all walks of life who want improve their lives by achieving success, happiness and confidence!

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Review: Revival

Revival
Revival by Stephen King
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Not one of his best books, I gave up on this and came back to it a month later.

So what’s wrong with the book? Whilst the story telling is up to his usual standard, the story being told is not. It lacks pace and the characters don’t grab you and hold your interest like a regular King book. The plot is slow to develop and consequently the story takes place over the lifetime of the characters involved. The ending is when King chooses to pull the threads together and is adequate but not one of his best.

There are a few chapters where you want to read on and find out what happens next but these are few and far between. I have to say I’m disappointed by this book, it contains the smallest of ideas stretched out to fill a whole book and King is capable of much more…

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